Leo Varadkar’s contradiction has ‘caught up with him’ - by opposing Sinn Fein

Writing in The Telegraph Conservative MEP Daniel Hanna wrote: “Until last week, the mainstream parties in Dublin tried to have it both ways, refusing to deal with south of the border while insisting on its inclusion in government north of the border. Now that contradiction has caught up with them.” the Fine Gael leader, argued during the election campaign that “ is not a normal party”, because its elected representatives took instructions from “outside”.

Micheál Martin, his Fianna Fáil counterpart, agreed, ruling out a coalition with the Mary Lou McDonald’s party on the grounds that “shadowy figures dictate what happens.”

Mr Hanna outlined the contradiction that exists when he claimed: “Yet at the same time, both men applauded Sinn Féin’s presence in the Belfast administration.

Mr Varadkar and Micheál Martin, the leader of Ireland’s other establishment party Fianna Fail, have exhibited a duplicity of policy by facilitating Sinn Fein’s power sharing in Northern Ireland, but on the other hand, repeatedly ruling out going into government with the party in the Irish Republic.

Mr Varadkar claimed Sinn Féin had no allegiance to the democratic institutions of the State, implying they were not fit for government, yet he has repeatedly encouraged parties in Northern Ireland to work with them.

Speaking to RTE Mr Varadkar said: “Sinn Féin is a party with plenty of ideas and policies

Mr Varadkar and Micheál Martin, the leader of Ireland’s other establishment party Fianna Fail, have exhibited a duplicity of policy by facilitating Sinn Fein’s power sharing in Northern Ireland, but on the other hand, repeatedly ruling out going into government with the party in the Irish Republic.

Mr Varadkar claimed Sinn Féin had no allegiance to the democratic institutions of the State, implying they were not fit for government, yet he has repeatedly encouraged parties in Northern Ireland to work with them. Speaking to RTE Mr Varadkar said: “Sinn Féin is a party with plenty of ideas and policies.

“Higher taxes, more borrowing, more debt.

READ MORE: Varadkar attacks Sinn Fein as Irish election turns nasty

In 2018 alone, foreign direct investment into Ireland rose by 52 percent.

It fell by 13 percent in the UK and these two figures are probably not unrelated either to each other or to Brexit.

One can question how much of this is sustainable and about how much of it is just vast multinationals moving money around to take advantage of Ireland’s 12.5% corporation tax rate.

But right now a lot of it is real and visible and not just in Dublin.

Employment has risen for 29 consecutive quarters since 2013 and is now higher than it was before the crash.

People have jobs now in Ireland, often well-paid ones.

But they can’t afford to pay the rent.

Over the period since the Irish economy started to recover in 2013, real disposable incomes in Dublin have risen by 13 percent, however house prices have risen by 62 percent, pushing rents up with them.

And while the young worry about having a place to live, for older people the biggest election issue was Ireland’s increasingly privatised health system that treats people according not to their needs, but to their wealth.

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