UK snow warning: New weather map shows Britain faces 8 INCHES of snow this week

Snow forecast maps have shown weather chaos, with the country bracing for heavy snow and ice to fall. By Thursday, heavy snow fall is forecasted across Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales, and the north of England. An Arctic freeze from the north will sweep across the UK, affecting Scotland most severely.

Inverness, Aberdeen, Dumbarton and Stirling all appear to be in the path of the cold spate.

Maps have shown the risk of snow combined with the depth of snow in some parts of Scotland reach 100 percent.

In Wales and Northern Ireland, snow risk maps show the risk of snow and the snow level combined reaches 85.

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Snow will hit the UK hard at midnight on Wednesday (Image: Getty)

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UK Snow Warning: At 6am on Thursday, the snow risk remains high in Scotland and Northern Ireland (Image: Netweather)

The snow is forecast to be localised at first to Scotland, but over the course of 24 hours it will rapidly spread to affect more of Britain.

The south of England, however, seems to be spared from the adverse weather conditions, with only Devon and Cornwall set to receive a smattering of snow across Wednesday and Thursday.

Two yellow Met Office weather warnings have recently been put into place, the first for snow and ice, and the second for ice.

They are to be in effect from 9pm on Wednesday, to 10am on Thursday.

READ MORE: London snow: Could London see another Beast from the East? 

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UK Snow Warning: By 6pm the snow risk dissipates but is still severe (Image: Netweather)

Uk snow warning Friday 6am

UK snow warning: Chart shows a snow depth of 22cm (8inches) for Friday at 6am (Image: WXCHARTS)

The warning reads: “Ice and snow may bring some travel disruption from Wednesday evening through Thursday morning.”

And the Met Office advises: “Showers are expected across the Northwest of the UK from Wednesday evening onwards.

“These will fall as sleet and snow even to low levels at times away from exposed coasts.

“Some accumulations of snow are expected, mostly above around 150m where more than 2cm is likely in places.

UK Snow Warning Scotland

UK Snow Warning Snow frequently hits Scotland hard (Image: Getty)

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UK snow depth chart for Friday at 9am (Image: WX CHARTS)

“In addition an area of rain will move across parts of southern Scotland and northern England on Wednesday evening, again with some snow possible but this mostly above 200m.

“Surfaces will remain wet from this rain and the showers with icy stretches expected to form.”

Ice is heavily expected for the majority of Northern Ireland, with the Met Office stating icy stretches could lead to travel disruption on Wednesday evening and Thursday morning.

Weather warnings read: “Some rain is expected over the east of Northern Ireland on Wednesday evening before showers in the west spread across the country.

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UK Snow Warning: Snow facts (Image: EXPRESS)

“These will leave surfaces wet with icy stretches likely to form overnight.

“Some sleet and snow is likely in the showers as well.”

The weather forecaster has warned injuries from slips and falls on icy surfaces are likely, as well as icy patches on untreated roads and pavements.

In Scotland, the weather warning for snow and ice is similar, with the expectation of disrupted road and rail travel.

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Recent adverse weather conditions have included snow in Wales (Image: Getty)

Met Office meteorologist Emma Salter said: “Overnight Wednesday and into Thursday we will see some frost and ice forming where we’ve had those showers in the north falling, and further cold nights to come as the week rolls on.”

Severe weather conditions have been rife all over Britain recently.

Flooding has hit Wales hard, and there are currently 51 flood warnings in place across the country according to the Government’s website.

There are also 183 flood alerts - areas where flooding is possible - with the Government advising residents to “be prepared”.

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